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Have You Been To The Happiest Place On Earth? [MAP]
Are you happy? Do you think your answer to that question is a result of where you live or of the choices you would make no matter where you lived? See what you think of this article’s assessment of the “happiest place on Earth.”

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Indigo Ocean

Writer & Social Innovator at The Winning Start
Indigo is the author of "Being Bliss" and "Micro Habits for Major Happiness." She has been a prolific entrepreneur and innovator who has founded several companies and service projects. Indigo currently focuses on her writing and her service project at TheWinningStart.com
Indigo Ocean
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Indigo Ocean

Indigo is the author of "Being Bliss" and "Micro Habits for Major Happiness." She has been a prolific entrepreneur and innovator who has founded several companies and service projects. Indigo currently focuses on her writing and her service project at TheWinningStart.com

11 thoughts on “Have You Been To The Happiest Place On Earth? [MAP]”

    1. It can definitely make happiness even happier, but if you aren’t happy for other reasons, money won’t be enough by itself. Some of the “richer” countries have a lot of relative deprivation. People feel poor just because they don’t have what their “ideal” has, as seen on TV often. Other countries expect less, so are delighted more easily, I think.

  1. I’m not surprised my home country isn’t on the top list here Indigo, as we have such a high suicide rate. Even though our tag line is ‘the lucky country’ and we have the most amazing weather, beaches, lifestyles and standard of living, something has gone awry in Australia with our levels of contentment. I believe it’s partly because so many Australians are isolated which is partly why I’m such a big fan of new technologies because I know it reduces the level of isolation felt by many here. Thanks for your insights. Namaste, Lisa

    1. I’m not surprised my country isn’t either. People here have so much, in terms of not just material things, but also in terms of freedom and opportunities for self-expression. Yet people still live such “imprisoned” lives, by dint of their own minds. They limit themselves, then feel unhappy because they are confined. I’m so grateful for having been raised within a family that honored self-expression and continual self-improvement.

    2. I agree with you Lisa and have felt such a massive change since moving from the big city (Sydney) to the Sunshine Coast region, which is more like a big community. There’s been such a massive growth here over. I guess people are catching on – wanting a place to connect more with people and their surroundings. Plus I totally see how Central and South America dominate the happiness countries list. Experienced the great happiness there myself and it left such a great impression. Plus I don’t think those country’s health are as poor as ours here in Australia!

      1. That’s so amazing to hear you both say this. I always think of Australia as this amazing place that has the perfect balance of so many things. I know a number of Americans who wish they could live there. I guess the grass is often greener elsewhere. We have to all learn to make our happiness wherever we are, even if a lot of people around us are reacting instead of creating their own happiness.

  2. For me, the happiest place is Scotland. I absolutely love it there. I was born there but only 1 when we moved away but any time I visit, I feel like I’m home. I understand why it’s not one of the “happiest” places though. The weather is always cold and rainy, which is what I love, but most people hate.

  3. Hey Indigo
    Very interesting read..I always love reading posts like this. I remember being in Costa Rica last year and I can see how this would be on the list. There is a lot of focus on education and the quality of life there is higher than some of its neighbors. Like many Latin countries, a strong focus on community probably accounts for much of that happiness. I got the sense that Ticos had a lot of pride in their culture and country. There is a growing push to address environmental issues, and it is one of the cleaner places I have seen in that area–they know their country is beautiful and rich in diversity, and many want to keep it that way.

  4. Hm. This is interesting. I am happy with the living part of living in Switzerland. The working part isn’t so great. I agree that money doesn’t equal happiness. I think that when a certain level is reached and the life costs are paid for time becomes much more valuable than having more money.

  5. Very informative! Its eye opening to see some of the countries listed on the top 10. I don’t think anyone would be surprised at the bottom 10. This definitely sheds light onto the fact that happiness is effected by many variables. Just because there is a higher standard of living does not mean that there is a high rate of happiness. Sometimes that higher standard of living comes with a price. That price can be connected relationships, close-nit communities, and social isolation.

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